Album Title
Artist IconPlanxty
Artist Icon Planxty
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4:28
2:52
2:16
4:11
2:38
5:34
4:23
4:06
3:34
2:21
2:41
4:09

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Back Cover
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3D Case
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First Released

Calendar Icon 1973

Genre

Genre Icon Folk

Mood

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Style

Style Icon Folk

Theme

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Tempo

Speed Icon Medium

Release Format

Release Format Icon Album

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Album Description
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"Planxty" is the first album by the Irish folk group Planxty, released in early 1973 on the Polydor label. Because of its dark cover, it is sometimes referred to as "the Black Album." Author Leagues O'Toole has written that the album "crystallises the 1972 set" performed live by the band during their first year of touring.
The album features a variety of traditional and modern Irish folk songs and tunes. It was influential in popularising this genre. The last track revealed the impact of Balkan folk music on mandolinist Andy Irvine. The traditional song "The Blacksmith" concludes with Irvine playing "Blacksmithereens", a tune reflecting the influences he gathered during his travels in Eastern
Although Planxty is nominally the first album by the band, all four members performed together on Christy Moore's previous album Prosperous, which opened with the same track, "Raggle Taggle Gypsy/Tabhair dom do Lámh". An earlier recording of "Sí Bheag, Sí Mhór" had been included as a b-side to Planxty's first single, "Three Drunken Maidens".
Recordings completed during the sessions but excluded from the album were new versions of the singles "Three Drunken Maidens" and "The Cliffs of Dooneen", as well as "When First unto this Country" (sung by Lunny) and the traditional Southern Appalachian song "Down In The Valley" featuring all members of the band, including O'Flynn on vocal harmonies.The latter track has since been released on Christy Moore's 2004 box set.
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