Album Title
Artist IconAC/DC
Artist Icon Blow Up Your Video
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First Released

Calendar Icon 1988

Genre

Genre Icon Hard Rock

Mood

Mood Icon Energetic

Style

Style Icon Rock/Pop

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Speed Icon Medium

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Album Description
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Blow Up Your Video is the eleventh studio album by Australian hard rock band AC/DC, first released on 18 January 1988. It was later released in the US on 1 February 1988. The album was recorded at the Miraval Studio in Le Val, France, in between August and September 1987.
The album was produced by Harry Vanda and George Young, the production team behind the band's early albums. This was also the final studio album to feature drummer Simon Wright. Although he wrote all the lyrics on the album, it would be the last on which Brian Johnson was credited as a songwriter (all songs on subsequent albums were written by the Young brothers). The title of the album was taken from a line in the song "That's The Way I Wanna Rock 'n' Roll".
The album was the band's biggest-selling album of new material since For Those About to Rock We Salute You, being certified Platinum in the US. Blow Up Your Video reached #2 in the UK and #12 in the US. However, the band played four tracks from it on the subsequent world tour, "Heatseeker", "That's the Way I Wanna Rock 'n' Roll", "Nick of Time" and "Go Zone". "Heatseeker" and "That's the Way I Wanna Rock 'n' Roll" are also featured on AC/DC Live Collector's Edition. "Heatseeker" was a top 20 hit in the UK. The album was re-released in 2003 as part of the AC/DC Remasters series. During the Blow Up Your Video world tour, Malcolm Young decided not to participate in the North American leg, in order to get over an alcohol addiction. Filling in for him was Malcolm and Angus' nephew, Stevie Young, although Malcolm was present on the rest of the tour and in the Blow Up Your Video promotional videos. The album was nominated for the Grammy Award for Best Hard Rock/Metal Performance Vocal or Instrumental in 1989, but lost to Jethro Tull's Crest of a Knave.
Outtakes from the recording sessions include the unreleased songs "Let It Loose" and "Alright Tonight", as well as other versions of "Heatseeker", and "That's the Way I Wanna Rock 'n' Roll".
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User Album Review
AC/DC remained a popular concert draw throughout the '80s, although such albums as Flick of the Switch and Fly on the Wall failed to replicate their mass U.S. commercial success of 1980-1981 (Back in Black, For Those About to Rock, a reissue of Dirty Deeds). But the successful soundtrack for Stephen King's lackluster movie Maximum Overdrive, titled Who Made Who, put AC/DC back on the right track commercially. Their first new studio album of all-new material in three years, 1988's Blow Up Your Video turned out to be their most successful album since 1981's For Those About To Rock, even though it was chock full of filler. The driving album opener, "Heatseeker," turned out to be a surprising Top Ten single in the U.K., while the anthemic "That's the Way I Want to Rock n' Roll" proved to be another highlight (video clips were filmed for both songs, as well). But from there on (with the exception of "Kissin' Dynamite" and "This Means War"), it gets pretty unfocused. The album is glutted with such throwaways as "Nick of Time," "Ruff Stuff," and "Two's Up" -- completely missing the point of what made such previous albums as Back in Black so great (they simply did not contain a weak moment). Blow Up Your Video also marked the return of AC/DC's early production team, Harry Vanda and George Young, who man the boards for the first time since 1978's If You Want Blood.


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